Featured Work

 

Knowing Neurons Neuroscience Publication

"How Neuroimaging Changes Our View of
Science and Humanity"

Illustration by Jooyeun Lee

The human mind is continually fascinated with what it has yet to understand, and curiously enough, the human mind itself is one such mystery. However, recent efforts focused on imaging and analyzing the entire brain, performed by both scientists and artists alike, have helped shed some light on this mystery. With this new technology, however, comes the question of how neuroimaging can influence the perspectives of a sentient being. What does it mean to see a reflection of our own cognition, both for our understanding of science and for our perception of humanity and living creatures?


Grey Matters Undergraduate Neuroscience Journal

Illustration by Chenhao Lu

Illustration by Chenhao Lu

"Building Palaces of Memories: A Glimpse at the Method of Loci"
Vol. 1, Issue 3

The method of loci is a memory technique that takes advantage of the brain's ability to manipulate spatial information. What distinguishes this method is its integration of multiple memory techniques, such as visualization, association, and organization of information. Users of the method of loci construct a mental map based on a familiar location, like their apartment or neighborhood. As the user practices walking through these rooms and becoming more familiar with the 'memory palace', it presumably becomes easier to recall information quickly and in an organized fashion.

 
Illustration by Benjamin Cordy

Illustration by Benjamin Cordy

"Smooth Brain: Lissencephaly"
Vol. 1, Issue 2

Imagine a human brain. Visualize its characteristic grooves and folds. See how they serpentine across the entirety of its mass, like a thousand rivers through a forest of grey and white matter. Now imagine if all those rivers had been dried up from the start. No more grooves. No more folds. The brain's surface is now a blank canvas, a mass of cells waiting to be painted with rivers. This blank canvas is the work of a neurological condition called lissencephaly.

 
Illustration by Ellen Van Wyk

Illustration by Ellen Van Wyk

"Dreaming of Reconstruction"
Vol. 1, Issue 1

As research in the field of perceptual experience advances, neuroscientists continue to uncover new methods to see through the eyes of human beings – almost literally. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), neuroscientists can observe brain activity while someone performs a task or responds to a stimulus.

© Alexa Erdogan 2017